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We are Human beings, all the same with one heart one brain the only difference is we have different faces and want different things in Life. I Am Band believe that we are all special all deserve to be reminded of this fact and we are having the same god given key to success. I am Band part of I am Industries wish to celebrate this fact, and to award all achievements and successful stories around the world. Awards should not just be given for the best singer, or the best football player etc but for all that have gone through some type of stress or problems to make it through the barrier and become successful. Success could be the mother who was left with 2 kids to look after and after working 2 or 3 jobs managed to put her kids through collide and give them an excellent education. That’s success as far as we are concerned and needs to be honored and awarded. The same for the boy of 6 who has accomplished amazing results at school, or the 1-armed boy who received 1st place in something that was extremely hard for him to achieve because of his handicap. To many these are ordinary but to us these such stories should be awarded. As success comes in all different forms events situations not just what we see on TV. Many around the world are successful but never honored for it or reminded how great they have done. I Am Industries wish to change this.

Our award department spends many hours finding successful stories around the world that we in turn give a free award to. This award is sent via email to remind them that we as a company acknowledge their success and wish to compliment this with our free award. This is sent to remind them that they are great and through all struggles have beat the game to succeed in whatever format. This we feel will remind them and inspire them to realize that yes you can do it and motivate them for other successful possibilities they can achieve within their life.

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I Am Band is proud to present the following awardees who have achieved their personal level of spiritual success:

Luca Tapanese

Naples resident Luca Trapanese had long wanted to adopt a child, but that presented problems for a gay, single man in Italy. “I was told that I’d only be given a child with an illness, a severe disability or with behavioural problems,” says Trapanese, 41. But he didn’t hesitate when an orphanage called to say they had a month-old baby called Alba with Down’s Syndrome that had been abandoned by its mother and rejected by 20 potential adoptive families. Trapanese says: “Since I was 14, I have volunteered and worked with the disabled, so I felt I had the right experience. When I first held Alba in my arms, I was overcome with joy.” Trapanese has documented his and his daughter’s life together over two years on social media–challenging stereotypes about fatherhood and the idea of family. “I didn’t mean it to be that way,” he says. “This is nothing but our life story.”.” [Source: Metro/BBC News]


Members of Youth Charity

Members of a youth charity in a north Paris suburb that is known for gang violence were amazed when their efforts to clean up their neighbourhood inspired a national clean-up campaign. Hind Ayadi, founder of the arts charity Espoir et Création in Garges-lès-Gonesse, got 40 young people picking up litter and trash to raise awareness of environmental issues and encourage them to take pride in their neighbourhood. “Teenagers don’t always feel preoccupied by environmental issues but this time they wanted to get involved,” she says. The volunteers then used social media to challenge the city of Marseille to make a similar effort. To their surprise, Marseille accepted the challenge, and in turn challenged Montpellier. The challenge spread virally from city to city, including Nice, Perpignan and 25 other towns. Back in Garges-lès-Gonesse, 16-year-old volunteer Adil Nazir, says: “It’s rewarding to see we’ve reached so many people. Now, we’re fully committed to keeping our city clean.” [Source: The Guardian]


Lucy Hughes

A 23-year-old British design graduate has invented a biodegradable material made from fish waste that could one day replace plastic in packaging. Lucy Hughes used fish offcuts to develop a strong, flexible and translucent material called MarinaTex, which looks and feels like plastic but can be disposed of as compostable food waste. In the UK alone, around 490,000 tonnes of fish waste is produced by the fish processing industry every year. It is of low commercial value and ends up in landfill or incineration. However, through her research, Hughes found that she could create a substitute for plastic by using red algae to bind proteins from fish skins and scales into translucent sheets. A single Atlantic cod could generate the organic waste needed for 1,400 bags of MarinaTex, she says. “It makes no sense to me that we’re using plastic, an incredibly durable material, for products that may have a life cycle of less than a day.” Hughes won the 2019 international James Dyson award for design engineers. Dyson, an inventor and entrepreneur, says: “MarinaTex solves two problems: the ubiquity of single-use plastic and fish waste. I hope it becomes part of a global answer to the abundance of single-use plastic waste.” [Source: Dezeen/The Guardian]


Benoit Lecomte

Long-distance swimmer Benoit Lecomte has swum 555 kilometres over the course of three months through the so-called Great Pacific Garbage Patch to highlight the issue of plastic consumption. The 52-year-old Frenchman (pictured) sailed from Honolulu to San Francisco, swimming through the 79,000-ton trash vortex he describes as mainly “an underwater smog of microplastic.” He spent eight hours a day in the water, finding everything from abandoned fishing nets to old toilet seats. His supporting crew collected microplastic samples and placed GPS tags on floating plastic waste, so that researchers can better understand how plastics move through the oceans. “All the plastic I saw didn’t surprise me,” Lecomte said afterwards. “I was expecting it to be pretty bad. But after seeing it, day after day, I became numb to it—and my numbness surprised me.”


Vienna’s Cafés

Vienna’s cafés are world-famous for their coffee and cake, but one coffee house in the city’s 4th district also offers a unique version of “gemütlichkeit,” that form of cosiness that Austrians have made their own. The Vollpension café is largely staffed by female pensioners, or “omas” (grannies), who lovingly bake the café’s strudels, chocolate tortes and poppy-seed cakes. The community-conscious enterprise provides its staff with extra income and an antidote to isolation through contact with younger customers. “This is more than just a coffee shop. Our guests are supposed to feel as if they’re at their oma’s place,” explains co-owner Hannah Lux, 31. The café is decorated with vintage items—lace doilies, animal figurines and other flea market finds—all of which add to the homely atmosphere. “It’s not easy for young and old people to connect in everyday life,” says Lux. Café worker Judith Siöberg, a grandmother of two, says, “We tell them our life experiences: it’s generations coming together.”


Samia Essabaa, a Muslim teacher, and Suzanne Nakache, a Jewish Former Pharmacy Owner

Islamophobia and anti-Semitism are continuing blights on French society, but two Parisian women—one Jewish, the other Muslim—have come together to fight the tensions between Muslims and Jews that they see around them in their day-to-day life. Samia Essabaa, a Muslim teacher, and Suzanne Nakache, a Jewish former pharmacy owner, co-founded the women’s group Langage de Femmes with the aim of bringing together women from different ethnic and religious backgrounds who otherwise would be unlikely to meet or hear each other’s point of view. They hold film screenings, social events and excursions. “We have women who wear the headscarf, cleaning women, executives from big companies, Jewish women who wear wigs, Christian women from posh areas, and secular women,” says Nakache. Essabaa and Nakache know they can make only a small difference, but they are determined to do their bit to foster better understanding. In early 2020, the group plans to travel to Poland to visit Auschwitz, the death camp where the Nazis murdered almost a million Jews. “We wanted to show what hate leads to,” says Nakache. “That was the fate of Jews then, but it might be Muslims tomorrow.”


Alison Botha

Alison Botha looked down on her own mangled body from a place she could only think of as death. Lying in a pool of her own blood, lifeless and unable to move, she asked herself if the peace she felt floating above was easier than fighting for the life below. She had been raped and tortured, but overcame.


Chris Gardner

In a job that only paid commission, Chris Gardner was homeless. But not hopeless. He was determined to make it work. He remembered the words of his mother: “You can only depend on yourself. The cavalry ain’t coming.” And so he learned what it took to be a success.


Kurt Warner

As Kurt Warner stepped out of his truck, the icy wind ripped at his face, turning his cheeks a splotchy red. He shoved his hands in his pockets. Making sure his fingertips could feel the cold coins inside. He had run out of gas on the way back home because he was broke. And broken. But he had a plan to turn it all around.


Jim Clark

He wasn’t bothered so much by the raw, naked greed. It was the incompetent dishonesty that enraged him. They were idiots in suits who thought they were taking advantage of him. Little did they know the measure of the man they were dealing with. The success of Jim Clark was as improbable as it was magnificent.


Dan Jansen

At 16, Dan Jansen set a Junior World Record in the 500m and came in 16th in 1000 meter. His next stop was the Olympics. Dan gave up the “other sports” and made up his mind to be an Olympian. But it wasn’t all smooth sailing. Far from it. For every up in Dan Jansen’s life, there was a down, it seemed.


Bethany Hamilton

Bethany Hamilton. At the age of 13, surfing prodigy and Hawaii native Bethany Hamilton lost her entire left arm after being attacked by a tiger shark just off the coast of Kauai. But while most would give up on their dreams, Bethany didn’t give up on her dream of becoming a professional surfer, she was back in the water and back on her board less than a month later after the incident.


Narayanan Krishnan

Narayanan Krishnan, all of 29 years old now, does what he was professionally trained to do as a chef. Feed people. Only Krishnan does not do this in the swanky confines of a 5-star hotel. Every day, he wakes up at 4 am, cooks a simple hot meal and then, along with his team, loads it in a van and travels about 200 km feeding the homeless in Madurai, Tamil Nadu. Krishnan feeds, often with his hands, almost 400 destitute people every day. And for those who need it, he provides a free haircut too. He was selected as one of the Top 10 in “CNN heroes 2010” list.


Bear Grylls

After leaving school, he briefly considered joining the Indian Army and hiked in the Himalayan mountains of Sikkim and West Bengal. Eventually, he joined the Territorial Army and, after passing selection, served as a reservist with the SAS in 21 SAS Regiment (Artists) (Reserve), for three years until 1997. In 1996, he suffered a free-fall parachuting accident in Zambia. His canopy ripped at 16,000 ft, partially opening, causing him to fall and land on his parachute pack on his back, which partially crushed three vertebrae. He later said: “I should have cut the main parachute and gone to the reserve but thought there was time to resolve the problem”. According to his surgeon, he came “within a whisker” of being paralyzed for life and at first it was questionable whether he would ever walk again. He spent the next 12 months in and out of military rehabilitation. In a showcase of what pure determination and hard work can do, on 16 May 1998 he achieved his childhood dream climbed to the summit of Mount Everest, 18 months after breaking three vertebrae in a parachuting accident. At 23, he was at the time among the youngest people to have achieved this feat. This is the inspirational story of the amazing Bear Grylls. He is known to the world as a television presenter for the Discovery Channel, with his own show called Man Vs. Wild.


Brian Acton

In the middle of 2009, he was the software engineer that no one wanted to hire. Despite a dozen years of experience at Yahoo and Apple Computer, he got turned down by two of the internet’s most upcoming companies at the time. First Twitter, and then Facebook. When he could not find any other company that would hire him, he teamed up with another Yahoo alum, Jan Koum, and built the application that has not only dominated cloud-based messaging but is also used all over the world. Yes, this person is none other than Brian Acton, who developed Whatsapp. Whatsapp was acquired by Facebook in 2014 for about $19 billion USD in cash and stock, making Acton’s net worth around $3.8 billion.


Carlos Edriel Yulo

Carlos Edriel Yulo (born February 16, 2000) is a Filipino artistic gymnast who has won bronze and gold at the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships. He is the first Filipino and the first male Southeast Asian gymnast to win in the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships with his floor exercise bronze medal finish in 2018, and the first ever gold medal for the Philippines in 2019 on the same apparatus. This performance also qualified him to the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.


Warlito "Tatay Amboy" Tumpap

Warlito Tumpap is proof that there are no limits to what persons with disabilities like him can do. Tumpap, or “Tatay Amboy” as people fondly call him, is unlike any other mechanic who does vulcanizing. He does not have legs after losing them to polio when he was still a child. His small vulcanizaing shop is tucked in the middle of the highway in Ilocos Norte. Sloppily covered by thin iron sheets, the vulcanizing shop caters to all kinds of ill-fated vehicles that break down along the long stretch of the highway.


Luisa "Nanay Ely" Pangindian

Luisa Pangindian, or Nanay Ely, is an 83-year-old vendor along the street of Tayuman in Manila. She is just one of thousands of Filipino indigent seniors who continue to work to make ends meet. Despite her age, Nanay Ely has no plans of soon retiring her small business.


Dara Mae Tuazon

Dara Mae Tuazon, an 18-year-old student from the University of the East, serves both as a student and a teacher. Tuazon has been teaching at least 30 street kids various practical and values-based lessons in her street mobile classroom along Gastambide Street in Manila. Through this, this student-teacher hopes to make a difference and help provide education for the Gastambide kids.


George Cordovilla

George Cordovilla is known for his undying commitment to preserve the beauty and rich biodiversity of Mayon. It is because of his love for the volcano that he earned the title "Tiger of Mt Mayon." He was also one of the key figures who helped save tourists during a small phreatic event in Mt Mayon back in May 2013. For him, climbing a mountain is a balancing act between enjoying nature’s wonders and exercising responsibility. Ultimately, he wishes that people who climb share his love and passion for taking care of mountains.

Naples resident Luca Trapanese had long wanted to adopt a child, but that presented problems for a gay, single man in Italy. “I was told that I’d only be given a child with an illness, a severe disability or with behavioural problems,” says Trapanese, 41. But he didn’t hesitate when an orphanage called to say they had a month-old baby called Alba with Down’s Syndrome that had been abandoned by its mother and rejected by 20 potential adoptive families. Trapanese says: “Since I was 14, I have volunteered and worked with the disabled, so I felt I had the right experience. When I first held Alba in my arms, I was overcome with joy.” Trapanese has documented his and his daughter’s life together over two years on social media–challenging stereotypes about fatherhood and the idea of family. “I didn’t mean it to be that way,” he says. “This is nothing but our life story.” [Source: Metro/BBC News]

Members of a youth charity in a north Paris suburb that is known for gang violence were amazed when their efforts to clean up their neighbourhood inspired a national clean-up campaign. Hind Ayadi, founder of the arts charity Espoir et Création in Garges-lès-Gonesse, got 40 young people picking up litter and trash to raise awareness of environmental issues and encourage them to take pride in their neighbourhood. “Teenagers don’t always feel preoccupied by environmental issues but this time they wanted to get involved,” she says. The volunteers then used social media to challenge the city of Marseille to make a similar effort. To their surprise, Marseille accepted the challenge, and in turn challenged Montpellier. The challenge spread virally from city to city, including Nice, Perpignan and 25 other towns. Back in Garges-lès-Gonesse, 16-year-old volunteer Adil Nazir, says: “It’s rewarding to see we’ve reached so many people. Now, we’re fully committed to keeping our city clean.” [Source: The Guardian]

A 23-year-old British design graduate has invented a biodegradable material made from fish waste that could one day replace plastic in packaging. Lucy Hughes used fish offcuts to develop a strong, flexible and translucent material called MarinaTex, which looks and feels like plastic but can be disposed of as compostable food waste. In the UK alone, around 490,000 tonnes of fish waste is produced by the fish processing industry every year. It is of low commercial value and ends up in landfill or incineration. However, through her research, Hughes found that she could create a substitute for plastic by using red algae to bind proteins from fish skins and scales into translucent sheets. A single Atlantic cod could generate the organic waste needed for 1,400 bags of MarinaTex, she says. “It makes no sense to me that we’re using plastic, an incredibly durable material, for products that may have a life cycle of less than a day.” Hughes won the 2019 international James Dyson award for design engineers. Dyson, an inventor and entrepreneur, says: “MarinaTex solves two problems: the ubiquity of single-use plastic and fish waste. I hope it becomes part of a global answer to the abundance of single-use plastic waste.” [Source: Dezeen/The Guardian]

Long-distance swimmer Benoit Lecomte has swum 555 kilometres over the course of three months through the so-called Great Pacific Garbage Patch to highlight the issue of plastic consumption. The 52-year-old Frenchman (pictured) sailed from Honolulu to San Francisco, swimming through the 79,000-ton trash vortex he describes as mainly “an underwater smog of microplastic.” He spent eight hours a day in the water, finding everything from abandoned fishing nets to old toilet seats. His supporting crew collected microplastic samples and placed GPS tags on floating plastic waste, so that researchers can better understand how plastics move through the oceans. “All the plastic I saw didn’t surprise me,” Lecomte said afterwards. “I was expecting it to be pretty bad. But after seeing it, day after day, I became numb to it—and my numbness surprised me.”

Vienna’s cafés are world-famous for their coffee and cake, but one coffee house in the city’s 4th district also offers a unique version of “gemütlichkeit,” that form of cosiness that Austrians have made their own. The Vollpension café is largely staffed by female pensioners, or “omas” (grannies), who lovingly bake the café’s strudels, chocolate tortes and poppy-seed cakes. The community-conscious enterprise provides its staff with extra income and an antidote to isolation through contact with younger customers. “This is more than just a coffee shop. Our guests are supposed to feel as if they’re at their oma’s place,” explains co-owner Hannah Lux, 31. The café is decorated with vintage items—lace doilies, animal figurines and other flea market finds—all of which add to the homely atmosphere. “It’s not easy for young and old people to connect in everyday life,” says Lux. Café worker Judith Siöberg, a grandmother of two, says, “We tell them our life experiences: it’s generations coming together.”

Islamophobia and anti-Semitism are continuing blights on French society, but two Parisian women—one Jewish, the other Muslim—have come together to fight the tensions between Muslims and Jews that they see around them in their day-to-day life. Samia Essabaa, a Muslim teacher, and Suzanne Nakache, a Jewish former pharmacy owner, co-founded the women’s group Langage de Femmes with the aim of bringing together women from different ethnic and religious backgrounds who otherwise would be unlikely to meet or hear each other’s point of view. They hold film screenings, social events and excursions. “We have women who wear the headscarf, cleaning women, executives from big companies, Jewish women who wear wigs, Christian women from posh areas, and secular women,” says Nakache. Essabaa and Nakache know they can make only a small difference, but they are determined to do their bit to foster better understanding. In early 2020, the group plans to travel to Poland to visit Auschwitz, the death camp where the Nazis murdered almost a million Jews. “We wanted to show what hate leads to,” says Nakache. “That was the fate of Jews then, but it might be Muslims tomorrow.”

Alison Botha looked down on her own mangled body from a place she could only think of as death. Lying in a pool of her own blood, lifeless and unable to move, she asked herself if the peace she felt floating above was easier than fighting for the life below. She had been raped and tortured, but overcame.

In a job that only paid commission, Chris Gardner was homeless. But not hopeless. He was determined to make it work. He remembered the words of his mother: “You can only depend on yourself. The cavalry ain’t coming.” And so he learned what it took to be a success.

As Kurt Warner stepped out of his truck, the icy wind ripped at his face, turning his cheeks a splotchy red. He shoved his hands in his pockets. Making sure his fingertips could feel the cold coins inside. He had run out of gas on the way back home because he was broke. And broken. But he had a plan to turn it all around.

He wasn’t bothered so much by the raw, naked greed. It was the incompetent dishonesty that enraged him. They were idiots in suits who thought they were taking advantage of him. Little did they know the measure of the man they were dealing with. The success of Jim Clark was as improbable as it was magnificent.

At 16, Dan Jansen set a Junior World Record in the 500m and came in 16th in 1000 meter. His next stop was the Olympics. Dan gave up the “other sports” and made up his mind to be an Olympian. But it wasn’t all smooth sailing. Far from it. For every up in Dan Jansen’s life, there was a down, it seemed.

Bethany Hamilton. At the age of 13, surfing prodigy and Hawaii native Bethany Hamilton lost her entire left arm after being attacked by a tiger shark just off the coast of Kauai. But while most would give up on their dreams, Bethany didn’t give up on her dream of becoming a professional surfer, she was back in the water and back on her board less than a month later after the incident.

Narayanan Krishnan, all of 29 years old now, does what he was professionally trained to do as a chef. Feed people. Only Krishnan does not do this in the swanky confines of a 5-star hotel. Every day, he wakes up at 4 am, cooks a simple hot meal and then, along with his team, loads it in a van and travels about 200 km feeding the homeless in Madurai, Tamil Nadu. Krishnan feeds, often with his hands, almost 400 destitute people every day. And for those who need it, he provides a free haircut too. He was selected as one of the Top 10 in “CNN heroes 2010” list.

After leaving school, he briefly considered joining the Indian Army and hiked in the Himalayan mountains of Sikkim and West Bengal. Eventually, he joined the Territorial Army and, after passing selection, served as a reservist with the SAS in 21 SAS Regiment (Artists) (Reserve), for three years until 1997. In 1996, he suffered a free-fall parachuting accident in Zambia. His canopy ripped at 16,000 ft, partially opening, causing him to fall and land on his parachute pack on his back, which partially crushed three vertebrae. He later said: “I should have cut the main parachute and gone to the reserve but thought there was time to resolve the problem”. According to his surgeon, he came “within a whisker” of being paralyzed for life and at first it was questionable whether he would ever walk again. He spent the next 12 months in and out of military rehabilitation. In a showcase of what pure determination and hard work can do, on 16 May 1998 he achieved his childhood dream climbed to the summit of Mount Everest, 18 months after breaking three vertebrae in a parachuting accident. At 23, he was at the time among the youngest people to have achieved this feat. This is the inspirational story of the amazing Bear Grylls. He is known to the world as a television presenter for the Discovery Channel, with his own show called Man Vs. Wild.

In the middle of 2009, he was the software engineer that no one wanted to hire. Despite a dozen years of experience at Yahoo and Apple Computer, he got turned down by two of the internet’s most upcoming companies at the time. First Twitter, and then Facebook. When he could not find any other company that would hire him, he teamed up with another Yahoo alum, Jan Koum, and built the application that has not only dominated cloud-based messaging but is also used all over the world. Yes, this person is none other than Brian Acton, who developed Whatsapp. Whatsapp was acquired by Facebook in 2014 for about $19 billion USD in cash and stock, making Acton’s net worth around $3.8 billion.

Carlos Edriel Yulo (born February 16, 2000) is a Filipino artistic gymnast who has won bronze and gold at the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships. He is the first Filipino and the first male Southeast Asian gymnast to win in the World Artistic Gymnastics Championships with his floor exercise bronze medal finish in 2018, and the first ever gold medal for the Philippines in 2019 on the same apparatus. This performance also qualified him to the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

Warlito Tumpap is proof that there are no limits to what persons with disabilities like him can do. Tumpap, or “Tatay Amboy” as people fondly call him, is unlike any other mechanic who does vulcanizing. He does not have legs after losing them to polio when he was still a child. His small vulcanizaing shop is tucked in the middle of the highway in Ilocos Norte. Sloppily covered by thin iron sheets, the vulcanizing shop caters to all kinds of ill-fated vehicles that break down along the long stretch of the highway.

Luisa Pangindian, or Nanay Ely, is an 83-year-old vendor along the street of Tayuman in Manila. She is just one of thousands of Filipino indigent seniors who continue to work to make ends meet. Despite her age, Nanay Ely has no plans of soon retiring her small business.

Dara Mae Tuazon, an 18-year-old student from the University of the East, serves both as a student and a teacher. Tuazon has been teaching at least 30 street kids various practical and values-based lessons in her street mobile classroom along Gastambide Street in Manila. Through this, this student-teacher hopes to make a difference and help provide education for the Gastambide kids.

George Cordovilla is known for his undying commitment to preserve the beauty and rich biodiversity of Mayon. It is because of his love for the volcano that he earned the title "Tiger of Mt Mayon." He was also one of the key figures who helped save tourists during a small phreatic event in Mt Mayon back in May 2013. For him, climbing a mountain is a balancing act between enjoying nature’s wonders and exercising responsibility. Ultimately, he wishes that people who climb share his love and passion for taking care of mountains.




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